New Mexico Child Abduction Statistics


Steve Goldstein
Steve Goldstein
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New Mexico Child Abduction Statistics 2023: Facts about Child Abduction in New Mexico reflect the current socio-economic condition of the state.

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LLCBuddy editorial team did hours of research, collected all important statistics on New Mexico Child Abduction, and shared those on this page. Our editorial team proofread these to make the data as accurate as possible. We believe you don’t need to check any other resources on the web for the same. You should get everything here only 🙂

Are you planning to start a New Mexico LLC business in 2023? Maybe for educational purposes, business research, or personal curiosity, whatever it is – it’s always a good idea to gather more information.

How much of an impact will New Mexico Child Abduction Statistics have on your day-to-day? or the day-to-day of your LLC Business? How much does it matter directly or indirectly? You should get answers to all your questions here.

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Top New Mexico Child Abduction Statistics 2023

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 15 New Mexico Child Abduction Statistics on this page 🙂

Child Abduction “Latest” Statistics in New Mexico

  • One in six of the more than 25,000 instances of runaway children that were reported missing to NCMEC in 2021 were probable victims of child sex trafficking.[1]
  • Child sex trafficking was probably the cause of 19% of the children who escaped social services’ custody and were reported missing to NCMEC in 2021.[1]
  • 733 children who were most likely victims of child sex trafficking received recovery planning and safety planning from NCMEC’s recovery services team in 2021.[1]

Child Abduction “Other” Statistics in New Mexico

  • In the United States, an estimated 460,000 children are reported missing every year, according to Federal Bureau of Investigation, NCIC.[2]
  • In New Mexico, burglaries make about 23% of all property crimes, which is substantially higher than the national average of 16%.[3]
  • Security systems were the most effective method of property protection in New Mexico, according to 39% of poll respondents.[3]
  • New Mexicans worry about their safety less often than the majority of Americans, by roughly 13%.[3]
  • According to WALB, Of the 15,207 people currently missing in the US, approximately 60% are male and 40% are female.[4]
  • Compared to 44% of Americans, 32% of New Mexicans feel the COVID-19 outbreak has negatively impacted their personal safety.[3]
  • New Mexico is tied with Louisiana for having the lowest percentage of residents who say they feel safe in their state (34% vs. 55% nationally).[3]
  • The number of reported criminal sexual penetration crimes in New Mexico has increased each year from 1,337 in 2006 to 1,408 in 2009.[5]
  • Aggravated assault is the most common violent crime reported accounting for 79% of all violent crime in New Mexico.[3]
  • Nine of the 25 worst places to raise a kid are located in the west, in states like California, New Mexico, and Oregon.[3]
  • Farmington, New Mexico’s violent crime rate of 947 violent crimes reported per 100,000 residents is the fourth-highest in the country. The average community reports 368 violent crimes per 100,000 residents.[3]
  • According to NamUS, from small toddlers to elderly adults, approximately 600,000 people go missing in the United States every year.[4]

Also Read

How Useful is Child Abduction New Mexico

One cannot ignore the emotional and psychological toll that child abduction takes on families. The fear and anxiety that parents experience when their child goes missing is overwhelming and can have long-lasting effects. Children who are abducted may also suffer from trauma that can impact their mental and emotional well-being for years to come. The impact of child abduction extends beyond the immediate family and affects the community as a whole, instilling a sense of fear and anxiety in all parents and caregivers.

Child abduction in New Mexico highlights the importance of raising awareness and educating both parents and children on preventative measures. Parents play a crucial role in keeping their children safe by teaching them about personal safety, stranger danger, and how to respond if they find themselves in a potentially dangerous situation. Educating children on how to identify signs of danger and what steps to take if they feel threatened can help empower them and reduce their vulnerability to abduction.

Law enforcement agencies in New Mexico play a vital role in addressing child abduction cases and working to bring missing children home safely. The collaboration between local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies is essential in effectively investigating and resolving cases of child abduction. Through comprehensive and coordinated efforts, authorities work tirelessly to locate missing children, identify perpetrators, and reunite families.

Social services and support networks are also crucial in addressing the impact of child abduction on families. Counseling services, victim support programs, and resources for families of missing children are essential in providing emotional and psychological support during such difficult times. Community organizations and advocacy groups play a vital role in raising awareness, providing information, and support to families affected by child abduction.

While child abduction remains a significant concern in New Mexico, it is essential to recognize the progress being made in addressing and preventing these incidents. Through education, awareness, collaboration, and support, communities in New Mexico are working together to protect children and families from the devastating effects of child abduction. By coming together and taking proactive measures, we can create a safer environment for our children to grow and thrive.

As a community, we must continue to prioritize the safety and well-being of our children and take a united stand against child abduction. By working together, raising awareness, educating our children, and supporting families affected by child abduction, we can make a meaningful difference in the lives of our most vulnerable members. We must remain vigilant, proactive, and committed to ensuring that every child in New Mexico is safe, protected, and loved.

Reference


  1. missingkids – https://www.missingkids.org/ourwork/impact
  2. usatoday – https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/economy/2018/08/17/worst-cities-raise-children/37381225/
  3. safewise – https://www.safewise.com/blog/safest-cities-new-mexico/
  4. walb – https://www.walb.com/2019/02/21/which-states-have-most-missing-persons-cases/
  5. nmhealth – https://www.nmhealth.org/about/erd/ibeb/svsp/

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