Earned Value Management Statistics 2024
– Everything You Need to Know


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Earned Value Management Statistics 2023: Facts about Earned Value Management outlines the context of what’s happening in the tech world.

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Top Earned Value Management Statistics 2023

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Earned Value Management “Latest” Statistics

  • The 50/50 rule is a similar rule that states that 50% credit is obtained when an element of work is begun, and the remaining 50% credit is awarded when the element of work is completed.[1]
  • One would first believe that the project is proceeding according to schedule if a project manager reports that he has spent 50% of the budget six months after the project began.[1]
  • Every year, more than 70% of all initiatives fail to achieve the intended features or functionalities or wind up costing far more than initially anticipated.[2]
  • According to thorough research by Fleming and Koppelman, after you have completed 20% of a project, you can use your present performance to estimate the project’s future with a plus or minus 10% variation.[3]
  • The International Space Station’s construction initially had a budget of $36.75 billion but ended up costing $105 billion instead, an increase of 186%.[3]
  • Although ES performs differently in each project, accuracy is observed to increase beyond 90% of the planned period.[4]
  • The probability obtained for the anticipated length of the project increased in accuracy with time to reach a value of 44.10% in period 27, the last period in the project schedule.[4]
  • The probabilities calculated for the Sopladora project’s duration estimate increased in accuracy with time, reaching a value of 74.20% in period 47.[4]
  • A probability of 64.30% was achieved in month 5 of execution, while it had increased to 97.80% in month 30 of execution.[4]
  • The likelihood that the projected cost would match the simulated cost in month 5 of execution was 17.8%; however, in month 50 of execution, the likelihood had increased to 99.60% and, in the following months, stayed at 10% until completion.[4]
  • The models generated relative frequency histograms for the cost and duration prediction, with the probability ranges calibrated at 2% of the entire project cost and 5% of the total planned project time.[4]
  • EVM is a potent tool that, in this context, offers highly effective cost forecasting after around 60% of execution time has passed, giving enough time for actions to be made to remedy any budget deviations found.[4]
  • It is evident that all projects reach a likely prediction accuracy of 10% after around 60% of the execution period has passed, and that rate is maintained until the project is finished.[4]
  • By the conclusion of the contract, it is anticipated that the CPI will not have increased by more than 10%.[5]
  • If a cost variation exceeds the 10% mark, the contract will probably end in an overrun.[5]
  • The level of efficiency needed to do the task while staying within the contract cost is around 10% greater than the current efficiency level.[5]
  • The variances are compared against a 10% threshold band in the standard cost and schedule variance trends graphic.[5]
  • To determine how much money you’ll spend overall, deduct that 10% from your budget.[6]
  • Even though you are months behind schedule, if you have completed 50% of the job and spent 50% of the budget, you are on track financially.[6]

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Reference


  1. wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earned_value_management
  2. rolandwanner – https://rolandwanner.com/earned-value-management/
  3. ecosys – https://www.ecosys.net/knowledge/earned-value-management-basics/
  4. hindawi – https://www.hindawi.com/journals/complexity/2019/3190830/
  5. pmi – https://www.pmi.org/learning/library/evm-data-analysis-executive-action-8520
  6. spiderstrategies – https://www.spiderstrategies.com/earned-value-management/

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