Nebraska Disability Statistics 2024
– Everything You Need to Know


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Nebraska Disability Statistics 2023: Facts about Disability in Nebraska reflect the current socio-economic condition of the state.

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LLCBuddy editorial team did hours of research, collected all important statistics on Nebraska Disability, and shared those on this page. Our editorial team proofread these to make the data as accurate as possible. We believe you don’t need to check any other resources on the web for the same. You should get everything here only 🙂

Are you planning to start a Nebraska LLC business in 2023? Maybe for educational purposes, business research, or personal curiosity, whatever it is – it’s always a good idea to gather more information.

How much of an impact will Nebraska Disability Statistics have on your day-to-day? or the day-to-day of your LLC Business? How much does it matter directly or indirectly? You should get answers to all your questions here.

Please read the page carefully and don’t miss any word.

Top Nebraska Disability Statistics 2023

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 37 Nebraska Disability Statistics on this page 🙂

Nebraska Disability “Latest” Statistics

  • In 2017, 11.8 percent of females and 12.6 percent of men of all ages in Nebraska reported having a handicap.[1]
  • In 2017, the prevalence of disability among Hispanic or Latino people of all ages in Nebraska was 9.1 percent.[1]
  • In 2017, 51.8 percent of working-age persons (ages 21 to 64) with impairments were employed in Nebraska.[1]
  • In 2017, 10% of persons with disabilities who were not working were actively seeking jobs in Nebraska.[1]
  • In 2017, 37 percent of working-age adults with disabilities worked full-time/year in Nebraska.[1]
  • The median annual earnings of working-age adults with disabilities working full-time/full-year in Nebraska in 2017 were $40,400.[1]
  • In 2017, the overall proportion (prevalence rate) of persons of all ages with disabilities in Nebraska was 12.2 percent.[1]
  • The highest prevalence rate in NE in 2017 was 6.1 percent for “Ambulatory Disability,” one of the six categories of impairments defined in the ACS.[1]
  • In 2017, the total proportion (prevalence rate) of children in Nebraska aged 0 to 4 with a visual and/or hearing handicap was 0.3 percent.[1]
  • 400 of the 132,600 children aged 0 to 4 in Nebraska reported one or more impairments in 2017.[1]
  • In 2017, 0.3 percent of people in Nebraska reported having a vision handicap.[1]
  • In 2017, 0.2 percent of people in Nebraska reported having a hearing disability.[1]
  • In 2017, the overall proportion (prevalence rate) of children aged 5 to 15 with a disability in Nebraska was 5.2 percent.[1]
  • The highest prevalence rate in NE in 2017 was 3.7 percent for “Cognitive Disability,” one of the five categories of disabilities* defined in the ACS.[1]
  • In 2017, the overall proportion (prevalence rate) of persons aged 16 to 20 with a handicap in Nebraska was 7.3 percent.[1]
  • In 2017, of the six forms of impairments described in the ACS, the highest prevalence rate was 5.1 percent in Nebraska.[1]
  • In 2017, 10% of White working-age individuals in Nebraska reported having a handicap.[1]
  • In 2017, 51.8 percent of working-age persons with disabilities in Nebraska were employed.[1]
  • In 2017, 86.4 percent of working-age persons without impairments were employed in Nebraska.[1]
  • The employment rate disparity between working-age adults with and without impairments was 34.6 percentage points.[1]
  • According to the newly released 2018 Annual Disability Statistics Compendium, Nebraska has a disability employment rate of 49.3 percent.[2]
  • According to a separate research by the nonpartisan advocacy organization RespectAbility, 2,068 Nebraskans with disabilities entered the labor force in 2017.[2]
  • There are 55,391 working-age (18-64) Nebraskans with impairments out of 112,418 total.[2]
  • By 2015, SEARCH has helped over 3,000 young adults with impairments, with 78 percent of them finding employment.[2]

Nebraska Disability “Other” Statistics

  • According to the state’s profile data, 8% of the population in Nebraska has mobility problems.[3]
  • According to the state’s profile data, 8% of the population in Nebraska has cognition problems.[3]
  • According to the state’s profile data, 5% of the population in Nebraska has difficulties living independently.[3]
  • According to the state’s profile data, 6% of the population in Nebraska has hearing problems.[3]
  • According to the state’s profile data, 3% of the population in Nebraska has vision problems.[3]
  • According to the state’s profile data, 2% of the population in Nebraska has difficulties with self-care.[3]
  • Among the six categories of impairments described in the ACS, those with a “Hearing Disability” had the greatest employment rate (74.3 percent).[1]
  • The difference in the percentage of working-age adults with and without impairments who are not working but actively seeking a job was 4.9 percentage points.[1]
  • Among the six categories of impairments recognized in the ACS, those with a “Visual Disability” had the greatest rate of not working but actively seeking a job, at 12.5 percent.[1]
  • The gap in the percentage of working-age persons with and without impairments working full-time/full-year was 31.6 percentage points.[1]
  • Among the six categories of impairments reported in the ACS, those with “Hearing Disability” had the greatest full-time/full-year employment rate (55.4 percent).[1]
  • The greatest yearly earnings among the six categories of impairments listed in the ACS were for those with “Hearing Disability,” which was $44,000.[1]
  • The median earnings gap between working-age adults with and without impairments who worked full-time/year was $5,100.[1]

Also Read

How Useful is Nebraska Disability

First and foremost, it is paramount to highlight the necessity of any disability program in ensuring that individuals with disabilities have access to the resources and services they require. Nebraska Disability, like other similar programs, endeavors to provide financial assistance, comprehensive healthcare, and vocational training opportunities for individuals with disabilities in the state. By offering such support, it strives to empower disabled individuals to achieve a better quality of life while fostering inclusivity.

However, it is worth contemplating the extensive bureaucracy and complexities often associated with disability programs. While Nebraska Disability has surely made efforts to simplify its procedures over the years, critics argue that there is still room for improvement to ensure the smooth delivery of services. Critics therefore question the program’s overall efficiency and effectiveness in reaching those in need promptly. Streamlining the application process and increasing the transparency of decision-making might be areas where Nebraska Disability could make further progress, effectively addressing these concerns.

Furthermore, the funds allocated to Nebraska Disability must be distributed judiciously to ensure maximum impact. Given the limited resources available, it becomes imperative to examine whether the funds are utilized appropriately and whether they reach the intended recipients. To ensure equitable distribution, there should be regular audits and evaluations of the program’s financial aspects. A carefully administered system will guarantee that the financial assistance reaches those who are genuinely in need and that every dollar is utilized to its fullest potential.

Another important aspect to consider is the potential impact that Nebraska Disability has on the perception of people with disabilities within society. An effective disability program can shape attitudes and increase understanding, acceptance, and integration within the community. Nebraska Disability, by carrying out programs and initiatives that promote awareness and advocate for change, has the ability to reshape societal norms and build a more inclusive society. Raising public awareness about the challenges faced by disabled individuals and highlighting their achievements can foster empathy and inspire progress, ultimately leading to building a society that accommodates and values every individual irrespective of abilities.

In essence, evaluating the usefulness of Nebraska Disability is vital to guarantee progress for individuals with disabilities within the state. Combining a streamlined application process, careful financial oversight, and robust engagement with the community, this program has the potential to amplify its impact. Constructive criticism and regular evaluation can ensure that the state’s disability program is continually evolving and better serving the needs of its constituents.

By taking proactive measures to address concerns and enhancing overall efficiency, Nebraska Disability has the ability to become a leader among similar programs. Increasing the accessibility and promptness of services, as well as developing strategies to reshape public perception, will not only enhance the overall usefulness of the Nebraska Disability program but also improve the lives and well-being of individuals living with disabilities throughout the state.

Reference


  1. disabilitystatistics – https://disabilitystatistics.org/reports/2017/English/HTML/report2017.cfm?fips=2031000&html_year=2017&subButton=Get+HTML
  2. therespectabilityreport – https://therespectabilityreport.org/2019/03/13/nebraska-disability-employment-2019/
  3. cdc – https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/disabilityandhealth/impacts/nebraska.html

About Author & Editorial Staff

Steve Goldstein, founder of LLCBuddy, is a specialist in corporate formations, dedicated to guiding entrepreneurs and small business owners through the LLC process. LLCBuddy provides a wealth of streamlined resources such as guides, articles, and FAQs, making LLC establishment seamless. The diligent editorial staff makes sure content is accurate, up-to-date information on topics like state-specific requirements, registered agents, and compliance. Steve's enthusiasm for entrepreneurship makes LLCBuddy an essential and trustworthy resource for launching and running an LLC.

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