Vermont Child Abuse Statistics


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Vermont Child Abuse Statistics 2023: Facts about Child Abuse in Vermont reflect the current socio-economic condition of the state.

vermont

LLCBuddy editorial team did hours of research, collected all important statistics on Vermont Child Abuse, and shared those on this page. Our editorial team proofread these to make the data as accurate as possible. We believe you don’t need to check any other resources on the web for the same. You should get everything here only 🙂

Are you planning to start a Vermont LLC business in 2023? Maybe for educational purposes, business research, or personal curiosity, whatever it is – it’s always a good idea to gather more information.

How much of an impact will Vermont Child Abuse Statistics have on your day-to-day? or the day-to-day of your LLC Business? How much does it matter directly or indirectly? You should get answers to all your questions here.

Please read the page carefully and don’t miss any words.

Top Vermont Child Abuse Statistics 2023

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 15 Vermont Child Abuse Statistics on this page 🙂

Vermont Child Abuse “Latest” Statistics

  • There were 2,206 calls received by the Vermont Department for Children and Families that were identified as domestic violence and child maltreatment.[1]
  • There were 18,507 reports of suspected child maltreatment made to the Vermont Department for Children and Families (DCF) Protection Line in 2021, which is 2,785 more compared to the previous year.[1]
  • Out of the 4,423 child safety interventions opened by VT DCF Family services, 1,996 were investigations and 2,457 were assessments.[1]
  • Out of the 19,756 total referrals for child abuse and neglect from Vermont in 2017, 4,320 were referred to investigation.[1]
  • Vermont had a child abuse and neglect rate of 7.5 per 1,000 children in 2017 (878 victims that year), which is a 17.7% increase from 2013.[1]
  • The ethnicity with the most child abuse victims in Vermont is white children, which comprises 89.06% of all child abuse cases reported in the state from 2016 – 2020.[1]
  • Physical abuse is the most common form of child maltreatment in Vermont, which comprises 65.6% of all child abuse cases in the years 2016 – 2020.[1]
  • In the year 2020, there were a total of 308 children waiting for adoption in Vermont.[1]
  • According to data, an average of 0.15% of children in foster care were maltreated in Vermont from 2016 – 2020.[1]
  • The data from cwoutcomes.acf.hhs.gov shows that 5.2% of children experience a recurrence of child abuse or neglect from 2016 – 2020.[1]

Vermont Child Abuse “Abuse” Statistics

  • The Vermont Department of Health conducted a survey on 22,273 students in 66 high schools for their Youth Risk Behavior survey and these are the data gathered: 7% of students confirmed that they were physically abused by a partner and 6% experienced forced sexual intercourse.[1]

Vermont Child Abuse “Other” Statistics

  • 15% of respondents said that a romantic partner attempted to direct their everyday activities.[1]
  • About 14% of offenders under community supervision were being watched over for a crime involving domestic violence.[1]
  • According to the Vermont violent crime index in 2010, 83% of violent crime cases involve intimate partners family members, or acquaintances 70% of violent crimes in Vermont took place in homes.[1]
  • Girls were twice as likely as males to be victims of this sort of sexual assault, with 6% of students reporting that they were physically coerced into having sex when they didn’t want to.[1]

Also Read

How Useful is Vermont Child Abuse

One of the main purposes of Vermont Child Abuse is to protect children from harm and provide them with a safe environment to grow and thrive. This is an incredibly important goal, as children who experience abuse are more likely to suffer from a range of physical and mental health issues later in life. By identifying and addressing instances of child abuse, Vermont Child Abuse aims to break the cycle of violence and create a brighter future for children in the state.

Vermont Child Abuse also plays a crucial role in holding perpetrators accountable for their actions. By investigating reports of child abuse and working with law enforcement to prosecute offenders, Vermont Child Abuse sends a strong message that these crimes will not be tolerated. This can serve as a deterrent to others who may be considering harming a child, helping to keep children safe from harm.

Furthermore, Vermont Child Abuse provides support and resources to families in need. Many families who are struggling may not know where to turn for help, and Vermont Child Abuse can connect them with important services and assistance. By providing outreach and education to parents, Vermont Child Abuse can help support families and prevent abuse from occurring in the first place.

However, as important as Vermont Child Abuse is in addressing child abuse, there are still challenges that need to be overcome. One of the biggest hurdles is the issue of underreporting. Many cases of child abuse go unreported, either due to fear, shame, or lack of awareness of the resources available. This can make it difficult for Vermont Child Abuse to fully reach and support all children in need.

In addition, more resources are needed to effectively address child abuse in Vermont. From funding for prevention programs to training for professionals who work with children, there is a need for continued investment in efforts to protect children from harm. Without adequate resources, Vermont Child Abuse may struggle to fulfill its mission of keeping children safe.

Another area for improvement is the coordination and communication between agencies involved in combating child abuse. Ensuring that information is shared effectively and that all relevant parties are working together can help to prevent cases of abuse from falling through the cracks. By strengthening collaboration and building partnerships, Vermont Child Abuse can increase its impact and better serve the children of the state.

In conclusion, Vermont Child Abuse plays a vital role in protecting children, holding perpetrators accountable, and supporting families. While there are challenges that need to be addressed, the work being done by Vermont Child Abuse is both important and necessary. With continued support, investment, and collaboration, Vermont Child Abuse can make a meaningful difference in the lives of children throughout the state.

Reference


  1. vermont – http://vcjc.vermont.gov/domestic-violence
  2. kidsafevt – https://www.kidsafevt.org/about-childhood-abus#:~:text=In%202021%2C%2018%2C507%20reports%20of,day%2C%207%20days%20a%20week
  3. cwla – https://www.cwla.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Vermont-2019.pdf
  4. hhs – https://cwoutcomes.acf.hhs.gov/cwodatasite/pdf/vermont.html

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