Account-Based Direct Mail Statistics


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Account-Based Direct Mail Statistics 2023: Facts about Account-Based Direct Mail outlines the context of what’s happening in the tech world.

LLCBuddy editorial team did hours of research, collected all important statistics on Account-Based Direct Mail, and shared those on this page. Our editorial team proofread these to make the data as accurate as possible. We believe you don’t need to check any other resources on the web for the same. You should get everything here only 🙂

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Top Account-Based Direct Mail Statistics 2023

☰ Use “CTRL+F” to quickly find statistics. There are total 142 Account-Based Direct Mail Statistics on this page 🙂

Account-Based Direct Mail “Latest” Statistics

  • According to USPS Customer & Market Insights, 50% of customers have in the last six months trying a new location, service, or product because of receiving direct mail marketing.[1]
  • Consumers desire direct mail from businesses they are interested in, according to 54% of them.[2]
  • Based on startling direct mail statistics released by Data Targeting Solutions. Last year, direct marketing efforts had an average response rate of 4.9%.[2]
  • According to a Triadex services direct mail survey, 54% of customers say they prefer receiving direct mail from companies they are interested in.[2]
  • Small Business Trends provided a direct mail statistic, revealing that 62% of customers who reacted to direct mail ads in the previous three months also completed purchases.[2]
  • Because of getting direct mail from a company, 39% of customers test out a new firm for the first time, according to the U.S. Data Corporation.[2]
  • Consider the following direct mail data to contextualize the 42% response rate compared to other advertising channels, that response rate is around five to nine times greater.[2]
  • At least part of the direct mail advertising materials that homes received is typically read or scanned by 75% of households.[3]
  • Because the audience doesn’t have to devote time to comprehending direct mail, processing direct mail requires 21% less cognitive work than processing digital marketing.[3]
  • The best ways to monitor direct mail are pURLs (61%), call centers or phones (53%), and codes or coupons (42%).[3]
  • U.S. marketers spend USD167 per person on direct mail, which generates a 1,300% return on the USD2,095 in sales of products.[3]
  • It is understandable why direct mail often performs better than email alone given that over 75% of households read or scan at least part of the mail they get each day.[3]
  • According to Canada Post, reading and reacting to direct mail involves 21% less cognitive effort than reading and responding to emails and results in a considerably greater level of brand memory.[4]
  • 39% of marketers utilize chatbots and customized online content, while 53% of marketers use direct mail.[5]
  • Businesses with high ABM ROI were twice as likely to want to boost their direct mail spending in 2020.[5]
  • Companies that saw a high return on their ABM investments expected to invest the most in direct mail (64%) and content and target accounts (55% each).[6]

Account-Based Direct Mail “Target” Statistics

  • 49% of marketing professionals target specific accounts using their current tech stack, which includes CRM, MAP, etc.[5]
  • 80% of marketers claimed sales staff created and planned their list of targeted accounts.[5]
  • Metrics focused on the account level, such as target account income earned and target account engagement, are apparently the most useful in determining the effectiveness of an ABM program, according to 44% and 42% of marketers, respectively.[5]
  • Other significant difficulties include a lack of internal resources. 36% target account personalisation at scale while demonstrating ROI/attribution of 31%.[5]
  • Direct mail accounts for 63.6% of investments made by businesses with high returns on investment, followed by content at 54.6% and target account selection at 52.3%.[5]
  • Account-based marketing is about targeting campaigns to individual accounts, thus the first thing you need to do as part of your campaign is to create a list of significant accounts, even though it’s recognized as a top marketing priority by 30% of marketers.[7]
  • Marketers are opting to concentrate on fewer accounts as ABM develops. ABM accounts with 99 or fewer are actively targeted by 56% of respondents, compared to 47% in 2018.[6]
  • Companies that saw a high return on their ABM investments expected to invest the most in direct mail (64%) and content and target accounts (55% each).[6]
  • Companies who have had a significant return on investment with ABM measure pipeline created by 75%, meetings arranged by 67.5%, and marketing qualified leads by 63%.[6]
  • The likelihood of marketing and sales teams exceeding their revenue targets by up to 6% points might increase when they adopt an ABM strategy jointly and devote effort to developing the practices and procedures that go with it.[6]
  • An effective account-based marketing approach, according to Marketing Influencers, targets customers and prospects almost equally (49% and 46%, respectively).[6]

Account-Based Direct Mail “Aim” Statistics

  • A third or 37% of Americans claimed to be constantly overwhelmed by email, 17% report being so several times a day, and 21% at least once daily.[8]
  • A new info trends analysis claims that when ads are multichannel, response rates increase from 7.4% for print and 7.9% for email.[9]
  • 80% of marketers claim that the sales staff is in charge of creating and formulating their list of targeted accounts.[5]
  • The remaining 46% devote the majority of their efforts to nurturing and cross-marketing to current accounts and contacts, with 27% aiming to engage and convert existing contacts and 19% concentrating on nurturing and conversion of existing contacts.[5]
  • 80% of marketers who have an ABM program in place claim that it has tightened their ties to sales.[7]

Account-Based Direct Mail “Place” Statistics

  • 80% of marketers who have an ABM program in place claim that it has tightened their ties to sales.[7]
  • ABM is becoming more commonplace, as seen by the 7% of reports that the dedicated headcount decreased.[6]
  • Companies with complete programs in place state that their sales and marketing alignment is at 51.6%, their unified account foundation is at 40%, their running plays are at 40%, their measurement is at 36%, and their online personalized advertising is at 30%.[6]
  • In 2020, 61% of the businesses questioned had an ABM program in place in its entirety or were in the middle of a trial program.[6]
  • 91% of businesses with 1,000 or more employees will have an ABM program in place by 2020. 20% have plans to begin a pilot over the next six months, while 23% are already operating a pilot at 48%.[6]
  • Majority of businesses with complete ABM systems in place track an ROI of 54%.[6]

Account-Based Direct Mail “Mail” Statistics

  • Because a company was sending too many emails, 78% of customers unsubscribing from those emails.[8]
  • A third 37% of Americans claim to be constantly overwhelmed by email, 17% report being so several times daily, and 21% at least once daily.[8]
  • The trade organizations’ 2018 ANA/DMA Response Rate Report direct mail response rates were determined by the association of national advertisers and data marketing analytics to be 4.9% for prospect lists and 9% for home lists.[10]
  • According to USPS Customer Market Insights, 50% of customers have in the last six months trying a new location, service, or product as a result of receiving direct mail marketing.[1]
  • Consumers desire direct mail from businesses they are interested in, according to 54% of them.[2]
  • Another startling direct mail figure was released by data targeting solutions. Last year, direct marketing efforts had an average response rate of 4.9%.[2]
  • According to a Triadex services direct mail survey, 54% of customers say they prefer receiving direct mail from companies they are interested in.[2]
  • Direct mail marketing generates an average of USD2,095 in income per individual, according to Small Business Trends.[2]
  • Small business trends also provided a direct mail statistic, revealing that 62% of customers who reacted to direct mail ads in the previous three months also completed purchases.[2]
  • As a consequence of getting direct mail from a company, 39% of customers test out a new firm for the first time, according to the U.S. Data Corporation.[2]
  • Consider the following direct mail data to contextualize the 42% response rate compared to other advertising channels, that response rate is around five to nine times greater.[2]
  • A new info trends analysis claims that when ads are multichannel, response rates increase from 7.4% for print and 7.9% for email.[9]
  • At least part of the direct mail advertising materials that homes receive is typically read or scanned by 75% of households.[3]
  • Direct mail response rates are 9x and 5x greater than those of email, paid search, and social media, with an online display at a pitiful 0.3%. House list and prospect list response rates are 9% and 5%, respectively.[3]
  • Because the audience doesn’t have to devote time to comprehending direct mail, processing direct mail requires 21% less cognitive work than processing digital marketing.[3]
  • Direct mail has a 20% greater motivation response than digital media, making it a more compelling medium.[3]
  • First-class mail typically has a 13% intended home response rate, compared to 11% for standard mail.[3]
  • The best ways to monitor direct mail are purls (61%), call centers or phones (53%), and codes or coupons (42%).[3]
  • U.S. marketers spend USD167 per person on direct mail, which generates a 1,300% return on the USD2,095 in sales of products.[3]
  • It is understandable why direct mail often performs better than email alone given that more than 75% of households read or scan at least part of the mail they get each day.[3]
  • According to Canada Post, is that reading and reacting to direct mail involves 21% less cognitive effort than reading and responding to emails and results in a considerably greater level of brand memory.[4]
  • Direct mail has a higher response rate than email marketing, with 4.4% of campaigns generating a response when sent via mail compared to only 0.12% online, according to research by the Direct Marketing Association.[4]
  • Email campaigns come in second with 45% of marketing professionals citing social media as the most successful way to get a competitive edge, and the utilization of content or resources comes third with 42%.[5]
  • 39% of marketers utilize chatbots and customized online content, while 53% of marketers use direct mail.[5]
  • Businesses with high ABM ROI were twice as likely to want to boost their direct mail spending in 2020.[5]
  • More than 70% of individuals use social media, email, websites, and CRM as their primary tools.[5]
  • Email and social media will be the most popular ABM channels in 2020. 94% of advertisers use account-based marketing marketers, 69%.[5]
  • Direct mail accounts for 63.6% of investments made by businesses with high returns on investment, followed by content at 54.6% and target account selection at 52.3%.[5]
  • Companies who saw a high return on their ABM investments anticipated investing the most in direct mail (64% content, 55% target accounts).[6]

Account-Based Direct Mail “Other” Statistics

  • Direct mail generates a substantially greater level of brand recall while requiring 21% less cognitive processing work.[8]
  • Average ease of doing business benefits Alyce at 97% with an industry average of 93%; support quality at 95% with an industry average of 82%; and admin ease at 92% with an industry average of 87%.[11]
  • Alyce stacks up against the alternatives by doing business with Alyce (97%), Sendoso (90%), Reachdesk (95%), and Postal.io (92%); by easy support quality with Alyce (94%), Sendoso (90%), Reachdesk (91%), and Postal.io (93%); and by the direction of the product with Alyce (97%), Sendoso (90%), Reachdesk (87%), and Postal.io (88%).[11]
  • Account-based marketing is said to provide larger returns than any other marketing strategy by 85% of marketers that track ROI.[12]
  • This may be a very powerful tool for your sales staff as recipients are 10 times more inclined to act when asked for anything in return.[9]
  • 52% of customers said they would be willing to trade personal information for relevant, individualized product suggestions.[3]
  • For purposes other than product suggestions, 53% of customers would reveal personal information.[3]
  • 59% of respondents in the U.S. said they like receiving letters from companies regarding new items.[3]
  • Before making a purchase, 72% of customers say they like to interact with companies via a variety of channels.[3]
  • 78% of customers will only respond to offers if they are tailored to their prior interactions with the company.[3]
  • 82% of millennials believe that paper advertising conveys messages that are more reliable than digital marketing materials.[3]
  • 91% of customers are more inclined to provide their personal information to businesses if they can see how doing so would improve their experience.[3]
  • Consumers are over 80% more likely to make a purchase from a firm that provides individualized experiences.[3]
  • According to omnichannel marketing automation data for 2019, B2B marketers that use three or more channels are able to increase their purchase and engagement rates by 250% compared to those who only use one channel.[4]
  • The average order value for consumers who interacted with three or more channels was USD66.31, which is 13% more than the average order value for those who did not, which was USD58.70.[4]
  • A future account-based marketing approach is currently being planned by 34% of marketing professionals.[5]
  • 42% of marketers are tailoring their content to their customers in order to boost account engagement and establish lasting connections.[5]
  • Success is measured in 41% of cases based on account engagement score and in 46% of cases based on pipeline velocity.[5]
  • Compared to 2019, marketers will watch 5% and 2% more online webinars and blogs, respectively.[5]
  • ABM has been used by 51% of marketers for 1-6 months to a year, while 49% have been using ABM programs for two years or longer.[5]
  • 54% of marketers say they spend the majority of their ABM efforts trying to obtain and cultivate new relationships.[5]
  • 57% of marketing professionals are presently streamlining their marketing efforts by combining demand-generation strategies with ABM procedures.[5]
  • 60% of B2B marketers use net-new accounts engaged to gauge the performance of their ABM operations.[5]
  • 55% of marketers customize their content to engage customers in certain positions, while 61% do the same for specific sectors.[5]
  • 65% of marketing experts say that the ABM approach has been moderately effective in reaching the main goals that were established for it.[5]
  • The number of qualifying accounts is used by 67% of marketers to gauge the performance of ABM, while net-new accounts are considered by 63% of them.[5]
  • 73% of those surveyed said that ABM had significantly surpassed their employers’ expectations.[5]
  • By the end of 2020, 38% of marketers that want to boost their ABM expenditure by at least 10% do so.[5]
  • 91% of businesses with 1,000 workers either have a pilot program or a complete account-based marketing strategy in operation (23% or 48%, respectively).[5]
  • 21% of marketers intend to invest in ABM systems, while 22% plan to invest in predictive technology.[5]
  • 44% of people use intent monitoring tools, compared to 50% who use measurement and reporting tools.[5]
  • For account insights, marketing automation, and intent data, around 50.66% of people employ analytics event technology in digital advertising.[5]
  • Less than 25% of the marketing budget, according to 62% of marketers, is now allocated to account.[5]
  • The two most crucial pieces of data to gather and manage for ABM are lifetime customer value and an account’s financial information, according to 41% of marketers.[5]
  • About 64% of marketing professionals, according to ITSMA and ABMLA, predicted that their ABM personnel will grow in 2020.[5]
  • Around 70% of B2B organizations, according to a Sirius Decisions report, were already concentrating on advancing ABM initiatives.[5]
  • Influencer advocate-related material had the lowest prevalence of the six categories of content and experiences identified for ABM use, at just 29%.[5]
  • Asking peers for advice is still a common way to get knowledge, although 40% of people say they get their answers from online groups, up 11% from 2019.[5]
  • By 2021, the software will evaluate over 50% of all sales phone conversations, according to topo projections for 58.[5]
  • Since 2019, 21% more professionals are using chatbots, enabling more marketers to improve program automation while maintaining account engagement.[5]
  • The three largest obstacles for businesses just beginning ABM programs are a lack of funds (42.7%), a lack of talent (38.5%), and a lack of technological resources (33%).[5]
  • Face-to-face encounters will account for just 5-15% of a seller’s overall involvement in a sales cycle as a result of COVID-19 and social distance, according to Forrester research.[5]
  • During the projected period, the size of the global ABM market will increase from USD651.9 million in 2018 to USD1,196.9 million by 2023 at a compound annual growth rate cagr of 12.9%.[5]
  • Marketers said that they intended to expand employees by 19.3% and the budget by an average of 21.3%.[5]
  • For 32% of marketers who understand that the two must work together harmoniously to succeed with ABM, marketing and sales alignment is still another major hurdle.[5]
  • 33% of the 63% of marketers that utilize behavioral and intent signals anticipate and identify new accounts using intent tools, while 30% do so using traditional firmographic and technographic data to educate and identify their ICPs.[5]
  • ABM accounted for 29%, or over a third, of marketing expenses on average, and 73% of businesses anticipate raising that amount by an average of 21% by the end of 2020.[5]
  • ABM budgets typically represent 36% of digital marketing expenditures and are growing by 9% yearly.[5]
  • The top three learning sources for ABM practitioners are online webinars (76%), blogs (60%), and whitepapers (42%).[5]
  • Only 13% of respondents to the poll had marketing expenditures that are larger than 50% of the total.[5]
  • Upon measuring the success of B2B ABM programs, they arrived at 52% of qualifying accounts, 50% of pipeline income and 50% of wins were mentioned.[5]
  • Since 2019, 36% more professionals have created personalized website content, indicating an increasing trend of marketers interacting with their accounts in a more personal manner.[5]
  • Videos are among the most popular content forms used by 45% of marketers. Marketers’ research comprises (46%), infographics (39%), and analyst reports (33%).[5]
  • However, 30% of marketers do not already use account-based marketing, despite the fact that it is listed as a top marketing objective.[7]
  • For instance, according to data from marketing and sales firms, 67% of B2B customers believe that relevant communication.[7]
  • According to a Sirius Decisions survey, 91% of businesses adopting ABM were able to raise the average transaction size, with 25% of participants reporting increases of more than 50% or more.[7]
  • Amazingly, 60% of businesses using ABM reported a revenue rise of at least 10% within a year, and 1 in 5 businesses saw a revenue gain of 30% or more.[7]
  • 95% of B2B buyers, according to a Demand Gen Report poll, choose a solution supplier that offers them enough material to assist them through each step of the purchase process.[7]
  • According to ITSMA research, 87% of marketers that track ROI agree that ABM surpasses all other marketing expenditures.[7]
  • Which explains why 92% of B2B marketers in a Sirius Decisions research regard ABM as being crucial to their overall marketing efforts.[7]
  • According to 39% of marketing influencers, a difficult obstacle to the success of an ABM approach is correlating marketing efforts to income.[6]
  • 60% of businesses using ABM reported a revenue gain of at least 10% within a year, while 1 in 5 businesses saw a revenue increase of 30% or more.[6]
  • An account-based marketing approach is effective at reaching the top priorities, according to 95% of marketing influencers, with 40% of them identifying it as the best in class.[6]
  • State of the market 2017 by ABM leadership alliance according to 91% of respondents, deals for ABM accounts are bigger.[6]
  • The majority of people are implementing or testing the plan, with just 12% overall saying they aren’t.[6]
  • After deploying their ABM approach, B2B marketers saw an increase in average annual contract value of 171%.[6]
  • According to these data, the program will be completely implemented in over 90% of organizations with more than 1,000 employees by 2020.[6]
  • For 39% of marketing influencers, creating personalized content is both the most successful and challenging digital medium to utilize.[6]
  • For those that have fully implemented ABM programs, it now accounts for 39% of the overall budget in 2020, up from 33% in 2019.[6]
  • According to 94% of respondents, ABM coexists with their other marketing strategies.[6]
  • 18% of businesses intended to expand the implementation of account-based sales and marketing in 2018.[6]
  • ABM is very essential or very significant to the overall marketing activities of 92% of participating B2B organizations.[6]
  • The largest obstacles to early stage abm initiatives are a lack of funding (47.2%), an inability to execute (38.51%), and a lack of technological resources (33.01%).[6]
  • Those with the best ROI from abm 2x their investment reported that 61% of teams were participating, compared to more mature programs’ average participation rate of 51%.[6]
  • The majority of the firms polled were either running an abm pilot program (26%) or had completely implemented an ABM program during the last six months (26%).[6]

Also Read

How Useful is Account Based Direct Mail

Proponents of ABM argue that it allows for a more targeted and personalized approach to reaching potential customers. By tailoring messaging and content specifically to individual accounts, companies can create a more impactful and personalized experience for their target audience. This can lead to higher engagement rates and ultimately, more conversions.

ABM also offers the opportunity to reach decision-makers directly, rather than relying on broad-based marketing campaigns that may not be as targeted. By focusing on a select group of accounts, companies can tailor their messaging to address the specific needs and pain points of those accounts, making it more likely that they will capture the attention of key stakeholders.

Another advantage of Account Based Direct Mail is its versatility. Companies can use a variety of direct mail formats, including letters, postcards, and packages, to reach their target accounts. This allows for creativity in how companies engage with their audience, making it more likely that their messaging will stand out in a crowded digital landscape.

However, despite the many advantages of ABM, there are also some limitations to consider. One of the main challenges of Account Based Direct Mail is the cost associated with creating and executing personalized campaigns. Sending personalized mail to a select group of accounts can be expensive, especially when compared to more traditional marketing tactics like email or social media.

Additionally, the effectiveness of ABM campaigns can be difficult to measure. Unlike digital marketing tactics that allow for real-time tracking and analytics, direct mail campaigns can be harder to track in terms of their impact on ROI. This lack of measurement can make it challenging for companies to determine the effectiveness of their ABM efforts and make informed decisions about future campaigns.

Another potential downside of Account Based Direct Mail is the limited reach it offers. While ABM can be highly effective for targeting specific key accounts, it may not be the best strategy for reaching a broader audience. Companies that rely solely on ABM may miss out on potential leads from accounts that fall outside of their targeted list.

In conclusion, while Account Based Direct Mail can be a valuable tool in a company’s marketing arsenal, it is not without its limitations. The personalized approach and targeted messaging offered by ABM can be highly effective for reaching key accounts and engaging decision-makers. However, the cost, measurement challenges, and limited reach associated with ABM should also be considered when evaluating its usefulness as a marketing strategy. Ultimately, companies should weigh the pros and cons of ABM carefully to determine if it is the right approach for their specific marketing goals and target audience.

Reference


  1. forbes – https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesagencycouncil/2021/01/13/how-trigger-based-direct-mailwill-supercharge-marketing-in-2021/
  2. fundera – https://www.fundera.com/resources/direct-mail-statistics
  3. postalytics – https://www.postalytics.com/blog/statistics-on-direct-mail/
  4. saasmql – https://www.saasmql.com/blog/how-we-generate-1m-in-sales-pipeline-with-direct-mail
  5. spiceworks – https://www.spiceworks.com/marketing/marketing-automation/articles/75-account-based-marketing-abm-statistics-every-marketer-should-know/
  6. tribalimpact – https://www.tribalimpact.com/blog/43-account-based-marketing-statistics
  7. superoffice – https://www.superoffice.com/blog/account-based-marketing/
  8. sendoso – https://sendoso.com/blog/direct-mail-vs-digital-marketing-what-data-shows-works-best/
  9. pfl – https://www.pfl.com/account-based-mail/
  10. designdistributors – https://www.designdistributors.com/blog/direct-mail-help-account-based-marketing
  11. alyce – https://www.alyce.com/blog/abm-direct-mail-g2-spring-2022/
  12. optimizely – https://www.optimizely.com/optimization-glossary/account-based-marketing/

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